EGYPTIAN MYTHOLOGY

The Gods of Ancient Egypt...

KHONSU

Picture of KHONSU from our Egyptian mythology image library. Illustration by Chas Saunders. Read the full story here.

Egyptian Moon God

Also known as CHONS, KHONS, KHENSU

God of the Moon and also of Time

Unlike most Moon Gods of Time, he is not an ancient figure with a long beard. In fact he’s a bright young thing who loves intellectual games and quizzes. When he isn’t holed up with THOTH playing Trivial Pursuit, he cures the sick by expelling demons.

Long ago, his fame spread far and wide and he was called to some distant domain called Bekhten to cast out a demon inside a princess. They were so pleased with the results they tried to keep him for themselves.

After a time, KHONSU got homesick. He recalled the demon and made an arrangement that the demon would leave the domain forever if a small sacrifice was made.

This was done and eventually KHONSU managed to slip back to Egypt — leaving behind a replica of himself in statue form.

If this all sounds too exciting, perhaps you might prefer his older and slightly more dignified lunar associate IAH. We always like to give you a choice.

KHONSU FACTS AND FIGURES

Name : KHONSU
Location : Ancient Egypt
Gender : Male
Type : deity
In charge of : the Moon
Celebration or Feast Day : Unknown at present
Good/Evil Rating : Unknown at present
Pronunciation : Coming soon
Alternative names : CHONS, KHONS, KHENSU
Popularity index : 9840

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Article last updated on 15 October 2013 by Rowan Allen.

Editors: Peter J Allen, Chas Saunders

References: Coming soon.

Cite this article:

Saunders, Chas, and Peter J. Allen, eds. "KHONSU: God of the Moon from Egyptian mythology." Godchecker. Godchecker/CID, 15 Oct. 2013. Web. 25 July 2014.

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